World League Against Alcoholism

The Anti-Saloon League of America saw conquering the alcohol problem as more than an American crusade. In 1916, at the convention of the Anti-Saloon League in Indianapolis, Ernest Cherrington presented an address to the convention titled "The World Movement Toward Prohibition of the Liquor Traffic."

After ratification of the 18th amendment was a certainty, Ernest Cherrington began to look abroad for new arenas in which to battle alcohol. He spearheaded two organizing conferences in Toronto, Canada, and Washington, D.C. in the spring and summer of 1919. The result was the World League Against Alcoholism.

Signatories of the constitution of the World League Against Alcoholism
Signatories of the constitution of the World League Against Alcoholism.

The World League Against Alcoholism had cooperation from temperance organizations around the world.

Temperance organizations and leaders from around the world
Temperance organizations and leaders from around the world.

It provided educational materials, posters and speakers to help promote the cause world wide.

For example, The New Europe and Prohibition: A Post War Survey was published in 1923, detailing the state of the prohibition movement in Europe at the time, as well as The Liquor Evil in Sweden, a transcript of an address delivered in Stockholm in 1929.

Additionally, posters were produced and distributed for everywhere from France to Canada to New Zealand.

At one point, it served more than 50 countries on six continents. It had lost much momentum by 1933 when Prohibition was repealed in the U.S. The struggling Anti-Saloon League could not provide support and attitudes were changing.

Hours
Mon - Thurs

9 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Fri

9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Sat

9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Sun

1 p.m. - 6 p.m.