Read Together

5 Practices of Early Literacy

Unlock your child's potential for learning & reading. From birth, your baby can start to learn about reading, like how to sound out words and what direction to hold a book.

  • Ages 0-1: Choose a time when your baby is relaxed and happy. Read for as long as your baby is interested. Just a page or two is fine!
  • Ages 1-2: Show your baby a board book. (A board book is made of thick cardboard pages.) Let them explore on their own, even if that means books get chewed on or thrown.
  • Ages 2-3: Read the same books over and over again. Pause before a predictable word and ask your toddler to guess the next word. Or ask what happens next in their favorite story.
  • Ages 3-5: When reading, hold a book upside down until your preschooler notices. Show them how to hold a book. Talk about the book’s parts, like the cover, pages, title, and author.

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Unlock your child’s potential with tips, storytime alerts, book recommendations & more from your library. Already receive emails from us? Update your preferences
Unlock your child’s potential with tips, storytime alerts, book recommendations & more from your library. Already receive emails from us? Update your preferences

Reading Challenge

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten

Unlock your child's potential with this reading challenge. For ages 0-5.

Imagination LibraryImagination Library

Fill your home library with books that will inspire a love of reading. Made possible by the Ohio Governor's Imagination Library. 
Fill your home library with books that will inspire a love of reading. Made possible by the Ohio Governor's Imagination Library. 

Literacy Tips for Parents

Share your childhood joy.

Tell stories about some of the favorite things you used to do as a child.

Concerned about your child’s speech development?

Get free advice from experts with Columbus Speech and Hearing.

Start a conversation at dinner time.

Dinner time is a great place to start a conversation with your kids. The Family Dinner Project has some fun suggestions.

Pick up a wordless picture book.

Encourage your child to become the storyteller with wordless picture books.
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